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🟩 GreenBricks Building of the Week 🟩 Old Sessions House

Georgian green


Originally Middlesex Sessions House – constructed in 1779 – it was once the biggest, busiest courthouse in England. During its heyday it earned a reputation for harsh sentencing: in one year, 200 convicts transported to Australia. Today, it is restored to splendour – the creative concept centred on “natural decay, contemporary classic and cosy”.


📍Location


🏢Building Details

  • 35,000 sq ft., Knotel ‘workclub’

  • Sympathetic redevelopment of Grade II* Listed Building

  • On site events include 2017 Burberry fashion show + Dezeen awards 2019


👷🏾‍♀️Developer


✍️Architects & Engineers


🌱Sustainability

  • Many historic building features preserved + reinstated: patina of aged stone + plasterwork, original pine floors, lime-washed brick arches, historic fireplaces and railings

  • 30% of furniture choices are refurbished, reused + vintage – another 40% is bespoke objects make to last from quality natural materials

  • Sustainable acoustic solution: features BAUX Acoustic Screens made from recycled PET bottles

  • Upgraded all electrical and mechanical services + addition of new comfort cooling plant


🥦 Wellbeing

  • Grand entrance experience: 20m-tall dome modelled on the Pantheon in Rome – filled with light, subtle planting, cosy furniture

  • South-facing private roof terrace with swimming pool + large Georgian sunbeds: panoramic London views = perfect event space

  • Workclub model allows people to select from flexible memberships that provide access to desk space, meeting rooms, F&B amenities + in-house events

  • Top level hosts Sessions Arts Club: original fixture in the old Judges’ dining room – transformed into laid-back restaurant with eclectic mix of European cuisine + extensive wine list

🎈Bonus feature

The vast, 18th century glass atrium was also painstakingly restored. Having survived the Blitz and subsequent addition of a second courtroom (which literally bisects the glass panelling) – it’s thought to be one of the largest surviving examples of its kind in England.


🔗 Check it out




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